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Posted by Trust Realty One on 5/22/2017

Remodeling your home is something you’ve likely considered for a long time and have carefully planned. However, if you’re not an expert carpenter designer it can be easy to make novice mistakes. Learning by your mistakes is fine, but when those mistakes are an eyesore or cost hundreds of dollars, you’re better off doing your homework in advance.

Whether you’re doing a remodel yourself to save money, or just because you have a do-it-yourself spirit and like new challenges, these tips will spare you many headaches and save you a lot of money along the way.

1. Inaccurate measurements

Unless you’re a carpenter or engineer, odds are you don’t use measuring tools on a daily basis. To ensure that you get the most accurate measurements, draw plans for your remodeling project to ensure that everything will fit in the space that you have. This includes measuring for the spaces you’ll be putting appliances, cabinets, and other items. If you’re installing drawers or doors, ensure that they will be able to open fully.

2. Using the cheapest materials

Sometimes you can find high-quality materials in the bargain bin. But most of the time it’s there for a reason. Working with quality materials will not only usually give you the most aesthetically positive results, but will also likely outlast the cheaper alternatives.

3. Underestimating costs

If you’re planning a remodeling project always be prepared to spend a bit more than your original calculations. There are several unexpected expenses that could arise during the remodeling process, including damaging materials by mistake, buying the wrong materials, having to purchase specialized tools, or needing more than you initially thought.

4. Not taking appropriate safety measures

If you’re a novice remodeler, safety needs to be one of your top priorities. You may be unfamiliar with some of the tools you’re using and likely don’t know some of the common safety hazards on the job. When it comes to electrical work, there are many projects that required a licensed electrician to perform. If you’re up on a ladder, be sure the legs are fully opened and secure. And if you’re on the roof, make sure you’re wearing non-slip boots and not carrying heavy items up and down by yourself.

5. Ignoring design and style

In today’s world of quickly fading trends and online inspiration blogs it’s easy to want your home to be several things that it isn’t. When planning your interiors, try to take into account the architectural style of the house. Similarly, if you’re remodeling one room think about how it will look against the backdrop of the rest of your home. Consistency is a too-often undervalued characteristic of interior design.


Those are five of the most common home remodeling mistakes to avoid if you’re planning a renovation for your home. However, there are many more. So if you take away anything from this article, let it be this: you have to look at your home every day, so be sure to take the time to do your research and plan properly so that your home comes out just the way you want it.




Tags: home remodeling   mistakes   DIY  
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Posted by Trust Realty One on 5/15/2017

Want to transform your homeownership dream into a reality? Understanding what it takes to enter the real estate market successfully is paramount for homebuyers. With the necessary preparation, you should have no trouble purchasing your dream residence.

Ultimately, there are several steps that a homebuyer should take before he or she conducts a home search, including:

1. Perform Plenty of Housing Market Research

The housing market fluctuates regularly, and a buyer's market can change into a seller's market quickly. As such, you'll want to conduct sufficient real estate market research before you start your home search so you can streamline the process of finding the perfect house.

Consider where you want to live and whether you'd like to reside close to family members and friends. Also, consider how much space you'll need from a new home, along with whether you'd like to live near schools, playgrounds and other local hot spots.

Don't forget to check out the prices of a wide range of homes, either. By doing so, you may be able to determine the price range for houses that match your needs.

2. Get Pre-Approved for a Mortgage

With pre-approval for a mortgage, you'll know exactly what you can afford as soon as you're ready to buy a house.

Banks and credit unions frequently offer a vast array of home financing options, making it simple for you to choose a mortgage that fits your budget. Fixed- and adjustable-rate mortgages are among the most popular choices for homebuyers nationwide. Meanwhile, you may be eligible for Federal Housing Administration (FHA) or U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) loans as well.

Reach out to multiple banks and credit unions to pursue all of the home financing options at your disposal. This will enable you to find the best mortgage based on your individual needs and enter the housing market with financing in hand to secure your dream home.

3. Hire an Experienced Real Estate Agent

There is no reason to enter the housing market alone. Lucky for you, experienced real estate agents are happy to help you find the perfect house.

An experienced real estate agent understands the ins and outs of the housing market and will share his or her real estate expertise with you. This professional will educate you about the real estate market and ensure that you know what to look for when you attend an open house.

Also, an experienced real estate agent will guide you along the homebuying journey. From the moment you spot your dream home to the day you finalize a purchase agreement, your real estate agent will offer the support that you need to go from homebuyer to homeowner.

Perhaps best of all, an experienced real estate agent will help alleviate your homebuying concerns. And if you ever have homebuying questions, your real estate agent will provide responses at any time.

Don't settle for a subpar home – follow the aforementioned steps, and you can move closer to discovering your ideal residence.




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Posted by Trust Realty One on 5/8/2017

Whether you’re a first time homebuyer or a seasoned homeowner, the terminology of mortgages can be confusing. Since buying a home is such a huge financial decision, you’re also going to want to make sure you understand every step of the process and all of the conditions and fees along the way.

In this article, we’re going to explain some of the common terms you might come across when applying for a home loan, be it online or over the phone. By learning the basic meaning of these terms you’ll feel more confident and prepared going into the application process.

We’ll cover the acronyms, like APRs and ARMs, and the scary sounding terms like “amortization” so that you know everything you need to about the terminology of home loans.

  • ARM and FRM, or adjustable rate vs fixed rate mortgages. Lenders make their money by charging you interest on your home loan that you pay back over the length of your loan period. Adjustable rate mortgages or ARMs are loans that have interest rates which change over the lifespan of your loan. You may start off at a low, “introductory rate” and later start paying higher amounts depending on the predetermined rate index. Fixed rate mortgages, on the other hand, remain at the same rate throughout the life of the loan. However, refinancing on your loan allows you to receive a different interest rate later down the road.

  • Amortization. It sounds like a medieval torture technique, but in reality amortization is the process of making your life easier by setting up a fixed repayment schedule. This schedule includes both the interest and the principal loan balance, allowing you to understand how long and how much money will go toward repaying your mortgage.

  • Equity. Simply state, your equity is the the amount of the home you have paid off. In a sense, it’s the amount of the home that you really own. Your equity increases as you make payments, and having equity can help you buy a new home, or see a return on investment with your current home if the home increases in value.

  • Assumption and assumability. It isn’t the title of a Jane Austen novel. It’s all about the process of a mortgage changing hands. An assumable mortgage can be transferred to a new buyer, and assumption is the actual transfer of the loan. Assuming a loan can be financially beneficial if the home as increased in value since the mortgage was created.

  • Escrow. There are a lot of legal implications that come along with buying a home. An escrow is designed to make sure the loan process runs smoothly. It acts as a holding tank for your documents, payments, as well as property taxes and insurance. An escrow performs an important function in the home buying process, and, as a result, charges you a percentage of the home for its services.

  • Origination fee. Basically a fancy way of saying “processing fee,” the origination covers the cost of processing your mortgage application. It’s one of the many “closing costs” you’ll encounter when buying a home and accounts for all of the legwork your loan officer does to make your mortgage a reality--running credit reports, reviewing income history, and so on.  




Tags: Mortgage   terminology  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Trust Realty One on 5/1/2017

Tourism is big in New England. Even so, New England states offer much more than rich historical locations. Culture, enterprise, social and community traditions help to make New England a great place to live and raise a family. There is no other region of the United States that is older than New England. If you value and appreciate history, New England is a great place to call home.

Diverse Landscapes – Oceans, beaches,mountainous areas and flat lands make up New England. Looking for great beaches?There’s Cape Cod, Nantucket, Falmouth and Martha’s Vineyard, to name a few. Quaint villages in areas like the Hull and Truro make for memorable, relaxing getaways. Of course, you could also purchase property in one of New England’s villages and regularly enjoy a quieter and calmer pace of living. But, that’snot all. Mountainous landscapes include Mount Washington, Mount Flume, Mount Liberty and Mount Mansfield.

Food – Although it’s famous for its breweries, New England offers savory food items. There’s hot clam chowder to warm you on cold afternoons. Cranberries, maple syrup, steamed clams, cheese and lobster are New England staples.

Waterways – Numerous lakes and rivers provide for great fishing. If you’re into fishing, board a boat and spend the afternoon relaxing while you travel down waterways like the Pow Pow River, Lake Attitash or the Kennebec River.

Sports – You don’t have to be an outdoors person to get into New England sports. If you love football, there’s the Super Bowl winning New England Patriots. Not a football fan? You and your family could attend Boston Celtics, Boston Red Sox, the Connecticut Sun or Boston Bruins’ games. You could also enjoy taking in one or more minor league athletic events.

Business – Major corporations, midsize companies and small businesses thrive in New England. If you’re an entrepreneur at heart, you could start a family business and potentially see a spike in sales if your business is located in a major business hub or if your business is located in a busy tourist spot. Cities like Boston, Hartford and Worcester are known for robust enterprise.

Education – Harvard University, Boston College, Yale University, Brown University, Dartmouth College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are located in New England. Secondary public schools offer robust curriculum to prepare students for admittance into one of the area colleges or universities.

Literature – Ralph Waldo Emerson, W. E.B. DuBois, Henry David Thoreau, Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost were either born or lived in New England. Storyland in Glen, New Hampshire takes popular childhood stories like Cinderella and Mother Goose from the printed page to the stage, connecting children and adults to the celebrated stories even more.

Arts and Crafts – Several arts and crafts festivals are held throughout the region, many are free to enter. You can also enjoy street festivals and local seasonal arts and crafts shows. Come as an artist and showcase your talents.

Climate – Just as New England offers diverse landscape, it also offers diverse climate. All four seasons are experienced in the region.

National Landmarks - About 20% of America’s historical sites or national landmarks are in New England. The country’s first public park, oldest newspaper and largest producers of blueberries hail from New England. Among the area's national landmarks are the Edward Bellamy House, Acadia National Park, Lebanon Green, John Adams’birthplace, W. E. B. DuBois’ childhood home, Ralph Waldo Emerson’s home and House of the Seven Gables.

Running out of things to do in New England is hard, especially if you like to get out and visit new sites. Schools, worship, entertainment, sports, shopping and community enriching offerings help to educate, inspire and strengthen people of all ages and from a broad range of backgrounds. You don’t have to be an avid fan of an area professional sports team to become a proud New Englander.





Posted by Trust Realty One on 4/30/2017

There's no question about it: Aging can be a mixed blessing -- especially if you're not prepared for it! Although aging does bring with it some advantages -- the most notable one being wisdom -- a certain amount of physical decline is inevitable.

Staying active and leading a healthy lifestyle are two ways to slow down the aging process, but there's another key element many people overlook when planning for their retirement years: eliminating tripping and slipping hazards in the home. Whether you're concerned about your own wellbeing or that of aging parents, here are several steps you can take to reduce the risk of injury from accidental falls.

  • Install or secure stair railings: While most homes are equipped with stair railings, they may eventually become loose, wobbly, or even detached. Making sure that all stairways have easy-to-reach, securely fastened railings can make life at home safer for everyone.
  • Stair safety tips: Slippery stairs (indoors and out) may need to have adhesive safety strips applied to them to help improve traction. If freezing temperatures are ever an issue for you, it's always helpful to have a small, easy to lift bag of rock salt on hand to melt icy walkways and stairs. Even though you may live in a warmer part of the country, temperatures do occasionally plummet to 32 degrees and below, so no one is immune to cold snaps and occasional freezing conditions in winter --even Floridians! Here's one cautionary tip that relates to basement stairs: For some reason, perhaps because of inadequate lighting, people (of all ages) sometimes take a tumble when they don't see the bottom stair. If this ever happens in your home, you may need to either make the lighting brighter and/or apply bright tape or paint to the bottom stair to make it more visible.
  • Reduce slipping hazards in bathrooms: Bathtub and shower floor surfaces can get pretty slippery when soap, shampoo, and water are added, so the use of non-slip rubber mats or safety appliques can help prevent potentially dangerous falls. Installing grab bars in showers and bathtub areas can make life easier and safer for aging residents or visitors in your home, too.
  • Remove clutter from floors and stairs: This objective can be more challenging when you have children who leave toys, books, balls, clothes, spilled liquids, food, and other miscellaneous things on the floor. However, when you have seniors trying to safely navigate their way around the house, keeping clutter and spills to a bare minimum is essential. That also holds true for minimizing tripping risks from cable wires, extension cords, and throw rugs.

If you're considering remodeling all or part of your home to accommodate either your needs or those of aging relatives, many experienced contractors and remodelers are well versed in products and strategies for making a home more senior friendly or handicapped accessible.







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